Future CMO Movement

Home » Posts tagged 'cio'

Tag Archives: cio

Marketing technology and Branding – free book

Originally published at http://chiefmartec.com/2014/03/new-brand-marketing-technology/

A NEW BRAND OF MARKETING – free book by Scott Brinker

A NEW BRAND OF MARKETING: The 7 Meta-Trends of Modern Marketing as a Technology-Powered Discipline

Click to Download PDF: A New Brand of Marketing: The 7 Meta-Trends of Modern Marketing as a Technology-Powered Discipline

“The modern CMO and marketer can no longer be just a brand ambassador, they must also have a deep understanding of marketing technology. Scott Brinker helps the reader to understand how technology can be used for both successful marketing strategy and execution.”
Jonathan Becher, CMO, SAP

I’ve written a very short book, A NEW BRAND OF MARKETING, that’s free to download and share.

It frames the epic collaboration underway between marketers and technologists, set against the backdrop of two seismic shifts in marketing today:

First, how marketing is taking over the business. We can debate functions and org charts. But in a hyper-connected digital world, everything that a business does — the entire customer experience that it delivers, from the very first touchpoint onward — is now the scope of marketing.

Second, how technology is taking over marketing. Marketing has more software entwined in its mission today than any other profession in the history of computing. Leveraging these capabilities requires new approaches to marketing strategy and management — as well as new kinds of talents within the marketing team, such as marketing technologists.

These two massive shifts are the result of 7 “meta-trends” — each of which has dramatically changed the nature of marketing. And collectively, they have created a whole new brand of marketing:

  1. From traditional to digital
  2. From media silos to converged media
  3. From outbound to inbound
  4. From communications to experiences
  5. From art and copy to code and data
  6. From rigid plans to agile iterations
  7. From agencies to in-house marketing

At only 40-pages, this is probably the shortest marketing book you will ever read. But if you want to understand the context in which marketing has become a technology-powered discipline, I hope it may be one of the most helpful.

Download your free copy now.

Reviews of A NEW BRAND OF MARKETING

As modern marketers, we have to embrace technology in order to stay relevant. But how? In A New Brand of Marketing, Brinker dives into the shifting digital landscape and illustrates how businesses can transform their marketing to be more inbound, and ultimately more effective, with tech-driven strategies.”
Mike Volpe, CMO, HubSpot

“Scott Brinker nails it with his articulation of the 7 meta-trends that have fundamentally altered — as well as empowered — marketing. Technology now fuels the marketing discipline, where science and art come together to build a brand based upon customer experiences, where the interactions are more inbound than outbound and truly global in nature.
Amy D. Love, CMO, Appirio

“Scott has penned a veritable treatise on the subject of marketing in the digital age of digital. In this pithy work, Scott captures the key meta-trends that will define how all marketing is done in a world of technology enablement and customer empowerment. The punch line: read it.
Terence Kawaja, CEO, LUMA Partners

“The leading meta-trends transforming and growing business at the convergence of marketing and technology by Scott Brinker. This short story is a simplified illustration of modern marketing, disrupted and transformed by the growing evolution and impact of technology, the modern the face of marketing.”
Mayur Gupta, Global Head, Marketing Technology, Kimberly-Clark

A New Brand of Marketing articulates the why of marketing’s fundamental changes over the past 20 years better than any book or blog post I’ve ever read. Scott, in his succinct and thoughtful voice, showcases the how necessary to navigate to a healthy and successful marketing organization as only a thought leader and expert marketing leader such as himself can. A must read for every marketer.”
Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, CMO, Mindjet

With A New Brand of Marketing, Scott has put traditional agencies on notice. Clients are evolving faster than agencies and their organizational models. A New Breed of Agency is needed, with an operating system that has Scott’s meta trends at its kernel. Every marketer and marketing technologist should memorize this short read. Gold!
Sheldon Monteiro, CTO, SapientNitro

“Scott has provided a great overview of the trends that are driving the long-term changes in how marketers do their job and the role that technology plays. This book provides much-needed context to help marketers and marketing technologists build long-term strategies that will let them thrive regardless of what comes next. Better still, he does it in a clear, enjoyable writing style.”
David Raab, Principal, Raab Associates

“Scott has brilliantly framed the dimensions along which marketing has transformed — and where it is headed in the future. This should be required reading for everyone in the industry.”
Dharmesh Shah, CTO, HubSpot; Author, Inbound Marketing

“Anything is possible when marketing and technology collide. Brinker’s A New Brand of Marketing concisely captures the fundamental shifts driving the most transformative time in marketing history. Read it, share it, and use it to accelerate change within your organization.”
Paul Roetzer, CEO, PR 20/20; Author, The Marketing Agency Blueprint

One of the most important marketing books I’ve read in some time — short and concise, but intensely relevant for today’s marketers. This is a manifesto for math marketers out there, and perhaps a final warning and blueprint to those who haven’t yet are the transition (but will soon be extinct unless they do).”
Matt Heinz, President, Heinz Marketing

“When asked, ‘What’s your biggest challenge?’ — most marketing executives reply that it is staying on top of the constant and rapid change that shapes the current environment of marketing. While I don’t know of any book that can solve that problem, Scott Brinker’s new book superbly sets the conversation in which that challenge can be met head-on and managed.”
Ric Dragon, CEO, DragonSearch; Author, Social Marketology

“Scott has put together 7 extraordinarily insightful trends that every CMO and CIO need to understand. He calls marketing a ‘technology-powered discipline.’ And while I might rather call today’s technology a ‘marketing-powered discipline’ — Scott would forgive me for fighting for top billing. It’s just a wonderful, insightful, and just plain entertaining read. This is one that every marketer and the technology teams they work with should read together.”
Robert Rose, Chief Strategist, CMI; Author, Managing Content Marketing

“Scott Brinker does a great job articulating a compelling and exciting opportunity for today’s marketers. The 7 meta-trends that Scott breaks out are accurate, digestible, and actionable. I suggest all marketers move this onto their must read list!”
Sam Melnick, Research Analyst, CMO Advisory Practice, IDC

“I love this book. It brilliantly and simply explains some of the most important drivers underlying marketing today. Scott lays out the facts, using data to explain what’s happening in the world of business as it touches marketing and technology.”
Michael Krigsman, Strategy Advisor & Analyst, Host of CxOTalk

Future CMO Commercial Community Introduction

The goal for Future CMO Commercial Community is to create a network of highly capable individuals who can act as supertemps or highly advanced specialists who can act as catalysts for customer centric, marketing and organic growth driven strategic and operational transformation for their clients. Below,  there are directions and requirements for those who would like to join this community and offer their services in Futurecmo.org. Future CMO is a platform for Symbiosis Strategy and I welcome you to join. Futurecmo.com will also be published later in 2014. Join now and we’ll get better service up and running soon. There will also be new and improved FutureCMO.org.

Here’s initial offering description:

Toni Keskinen, Founder and Cheaf Editor of Future CMO
+358 50 5522276
toni.keskinen(at)futurecmo.org
http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen
Located in Helsinki, Finland
Available for speaking engagements and consulting globally

Jarmo Lipiäinen, Co-Founder, Business Director and Consultant
+358 40 525 7289
jarmo.lipiainen(at)asiakkaanmatkassa.fi
http://www.linkedin.com/in/jarmolipiainen
Located in Helsinki, Finland
Available for speaking engagements and consulting engagements

About Future CMO Commercial Community: Anyone can contact Toni Keskinen and request membership in the Future CMO Commercial Community. The only requirement for enlisting is that you have original, fresh, insightful and important insights to share with the members. The best source for such insights and content is your daily client work which is why the most ideal members are people who actually get their hands dirty and do what is required to be done. Experiments and practical work generate the most interesting content. I don’t really think that this community is suitable for academics. The minimum requirement for membership is that you write at least one article in a month. The goal is that Futurecmo.org becomes a service with very high quality content and subsequently serves all members as a marketing & learning platform. Joint effort will increase reach and impact more than anything a single person could do. In case you are accepted as a Commercial Community member, you will get publishing rights to this service. There will be two types of FCMO Commercial Community members a) Supertemps b) Specialists.

Specialists:You should have practical, unique and original thoughts, ideas, insights or cases to share. Specialists should also be capable of connecting their specialist area in to general marketing and management realities.

Some questions that might help you recognize the supertemp inside yourself:

  1. Do you have both breadth and depth in your skillset at practical and strategic levels? Are you the one who recognize what, why and how should be done in order to drive much stronger performance, growth and profits?
  2. Do you have experience from multiple business areas with different business logics and aplications to value creation and competitive advantage?
  3. Do you have difficulties leveraging your full capacity in you current work?
  4. Do you want to practice your skills and learn much faster and more holistically and pragmatically than is possible in a regular specialist role?
  5. Are you happy moving from one company to next without a fixed team and do you feel comfortable facing challenges by your self together with a client’s own internal team changing in each engagement?
  6. Do you have a network of specialists around you, who can fulfill your shortcomings reliably and rapidly so that you can solve any given challenge you come across?
  7. Are you capable of driving co-creation development, designing customer centric operational change, business modeling and -cases and managing projects across corporate silos, levels and specialist ownerships like sales, CRM, online, analytics, BI, customer service, marketing, research or ICT?
  8. Do you impress clients with you skills, accelerate development, drive results and generate strong recommendations for your work?

Typical Must Win Battles that give us direction for relevant content creation:

  1. Best customer experience (Goals: loyalty, LTV, cross & upsell, high NPS)
  2. Innovative solutions: Creation of competitive advantage, distinctive and special offering capable of delivering substantial value, high quality at highly competitive price
  3. Continuous and cost-efficient new business (Goals: new customers, demand generation and stronger conversion)
  4. Lean and effective operations and processes – strong bottomline (Goals: highly productive organisation capable of delivering superb customer experience at comparatively low expences by using new technologies, online environments and automation
  5. Creation of inspired and winning corporate culture: Inspirational and very satisfying workplace capable of understanding and driving development and change. Corporate recognition as very prominent employer for hungry and innovative new talent, Topline growth energize the company’s employees and focus their minds on opportunities, innovation and growth. Growth is a lot more inspiring tool for profitability than trying to save the company to mental death

Organizing Marketing for Success: CIO-CMO collaboration

Forrester Research and Forbes made a study and article about CIO-CMO collaboration: “Why The Most Important C-Suite Relationship For Marketers Is Still The Trickiest” The article concentrate on the challenges and approaches to enable and enhance collaboration and how to create common ground and language between the two very different specialist areas. I did agree with everything that was said in the article, but I couldn’t help thinking whether CMO-CIO collaboration is actually enough. Customers today engage with companies in multiple touchpoints and environments, their expectations change along their customer relationship and -journey (check out article: definition for Customer Experience) and their motives and needs have great variation. In my opinion CMO should be in charge of customer experience, promises, concepts and methods that drive great brand experiences, brand loyalty and engagement. However, the reality is that currently many of those channels and touchpoints are managed by customer service and business units or online service development unit. Often the research and analytics are also outsourced or in a separate silo. In case the CMO really has the wide customer experience management role, I agree that CMO-CIO relationship can drive phenomenal success, in case that is not the case, there must be even wider collaboration across business units. Here’s Accenture Interactives documentation about the subject: “The CMO-CIO disconnect – Bridging the gap to seize the digital opportunity”

Tom Asacker captures why customers think of corporate experience  holistically. A brand, he says, is “one, interdependent system of behavior”. The problem is that in too many organizations the “system” has many masters and each wants independent control of their domain. CMOs, who might be expected to have responsibility for the overall experience as of right, do not. That’s because large chunks of the interface with customers, and the factors that influence that interface, remain for the most part outside of their control. They do not fit neatly into the “normal” org chart definition of what constitutes marketing. (Full article: Brands: One System Of Touch)

Some time ago I wrote an article in which I claimed, that the marketing organisation is like an engine from 60’s. “The Duke University’s CMO Survey 2013 results highlighted again the need for marketing and CMO’s to carry more responsibility and integrate better with the corporate management and operations. It seems to me that marketing is facing the same evolution that car engines have gone thru since 1960′s. In the 60′s car engines were large, heavy, powerful and impressive but their gas consumption was just terrible and their efficiency unacceptable in current evaluation. Currently engines are much smaller but deliver a lot of power with very low gas consumption. The big and impressive modern engines have amazing power with acceptable gas consumption. The engine game is all about efficiency, as it should be – and the same rule apply to marketing management”.

Inbound marketing technology provider Hubspot has created their view of agile, rapid, realtime, evidence based marketing function and organisation. They don’t actually define the business units that should be involved, that must be considered case by case. Hubspot’s process is based on SCRUM-software development process and methodology. I find this approach to marketing quite appealing and interesting. Inbound marketing is about creating content and turning that content and stronger online traffic in to demand and leads. The approach is all about relationship marketing in the digital era and omnichannel environment. Please comment if you have any experiences about implementing such process to your organisation? Check out the presentation:

I’m working with company’s customer interface development and customer experience design. What I see in my everyday business, is clear need to break thru silos and increase collaboration. The SCRUM-process and organisation outline in the presentation must be considered separately for each organisation. The SCRUM-team should be a group of people influencing customer experiences across the Funnel and customer relationship in order to really make most of the approach. Short term analytics and A/B-testing are naturally important tools in such approach to marketing, but also the long-term development must be carefully considered. The brand image changes rather slowly and is an outcome of everything the company does. The SCRUM process easily change perception to short-term development and generate blind spots in larger scale opportunities. Team like this must make sure that they have both insight and topsight views to what they are doing and developing.

Please, share your experiences about how to organise marketing function for success!!! What worked, what failed?

Author: Toni Keskinen, Marketing Architect & Customer Journey Designer

http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen

Join FutureCMO Movement LinkedIn Group here

This is how data makes money

This is a presentation that McKinsey consultant, Tim McGuire, made at the recent Direct Marketing Association conference. It is very thought-provoking and inspiring one, because it is about practical value and applications of data. In direct marketing scoring models and regression analytics have been an approach any seriously result oriented marketing responsible has already tested. However, the availability of data and applications in the rich and influential online environment has exploded the value to completely new level.

The CIO’s are currently challenged with new needs that come from marketing department and marketing department can no-longer operate without collaboration with ICT responsible people. Although Big Data sounds like an elephant, you don’t need to eat it with one bite. Majority of Big Data corporate scale initiatives can be done manually in smaller scale or with less expensive technologies. Testing, piloting, learning and calculating business cases from them enable solid foundation for larger investments and management attention.. even urgency. Every change starts from recognition and inspiration. This presentation might just spark that first step towards major transformation. Enjoy and share with your management team!

From Poor-Data and Poor-Insight to Rich-Data and Better-Insight

As we already know, organizations have ability to collect, store and analyze massive amount of data from multiple sources. They have spent a lot of money managing this big data. Investments in technology and analytics are useless unless employees can use data, information and knowledge in their decisions-making.  Many companies are facing a big challenge in data-driven decision-making. Good and rich data won’t quarantee good decisions on their own. I posted May 2012 an article about Insight IQ. It was based on April 2012 issue of the Harvard Business Review where Shvetank Shah, Andrew Horn and Jaime Capella argue that Good Data Won’t Guarantee Good Decisions. In this article I continue this theme a bit further.

Shah, Horn and Capella found that there are three main types of decision makers:

  1. Visceral decision makers (gut feel decisions)
  2. Unquestioning empiricists (rely on the number alone)
  3. Informed skeptics (gut feel with data)

If we consider the matter in data perspective I defined simple data collaboration or data insight maturity scale. It emphasizes level and maturity of data collaboration in decision-making.

Organizations on the right ‘high side’ are capitalizing the data in decision-making. They combine the gut feel with data and can drive decisions that make a real difference in productivity and profitability. They can drive real competitive edge from and behind the data. They drive all necessary information from markets for better decision-making. They know their customers and customer journey. Although the decisions can be very complex with limited amount of time and there are many options to choose from, they can still make the decisions and carry out them fast. These companies are the winners. They have hit the jackpot, but unfortunately I see these kinds of companies quite seldom. However, that is the goal to go for.

Another way of looking at this variety in corporate behavior is to divide companies in three categories according to state of data maturity. There are three types of companies: data collectors, data analyzer and data innovators.

1.       Data collectors

These companies are collecting and learning which data is important for their business. Light segmentation is used and it is more building and focusing on different customer groups. Analytical skills are very low and decisions are made as gut feel or based on basic sales figures and income statement

2.       Data analyzer

These companies have systematic way of collecting and storing data. They are invested in the technologies that are available to analyze the data. They can do basic business reporting but are not able to drive the real value behind the data. They are good at analyzing and reporting but suffer the lack of interpretation skills to drive deeper business insight.

3.       Data innovators

These companies are more comfortable with big data sets and technology. The focus is in how benefit from actionable insights and strategic big data. They have effective ways to share business information across functional areas that better decisions can be made. They have many data-savvy employees and data-driven decisions are informality in C-Suite.

Steps from data collector to data innovator

It is all about people, process and technology. Here are six steps to improve data-driven decision-making.

1. Emphasis on right data

  • collect all relevant information into one single platform
  • from business understanding to data understanding
  • automate the data collection process

2. From silos to holistic business view

  •  map all the relevant data, which is essential for decision-making
  • data preparation, consolidation and visualization are necessary
  • CMO & CIO partnership

3. Choose the right technology

  • find technology that meets your business demands
  • choose technology, which accept and read data from any source

4. Online reality

  • today’s business and business environment needs real-time data
  • online data as enabler of quick decisions and insights
  • rapid resource allocation
  • online business management and intelligent decisions

5. Create strategic marketing dashboard

  • KPI’s by channel
  • true values from returns and investments
  • identify risks and opportunities
  • measure and lead the customer journey

6. Create systematic analytic skills competence development program for employees

  • find the data-savvy workers in your organization
  • make them to train everyone else of their analytics skills and method
  • leverage analytics know-how widely in your organization
  • C-suites as exemplary for others
%d bloggers like this: