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Marketing has an identity crisis – Blue Ocean dashboard

I just found Dr. Rod King’s Blue Ocean dashboard and process tools from SlideShare today and thought about how necessary it is to understand the whole value creation process in order to manage brand effectively. The number one branding responsible inside the company is actually the CEO, as he is often the only person in a company responsible for the total experience.

Brand identity is a reflection of the company, it has to be real and true. False promises and wrong kind of identity only generate dissatisfaction and distrust. You are what you are and you can improve, but you can’t stretch too far. Marketing is often responsible for the identity design, business managers are responsible for the experience. This approach doesn’t work anymore – The brand from the customer’s perspective is one single entity and the experience and perception must be a solid combination.

Mr. Graham Hill, well-known and great CRM and customer experience expert whom I respect very much just published an article: How Stupidity, Short-termism and Immorality Ruined Marketing in Customer Think -blog. Here’s a quote:

“If you take a step back you will see that the ethos of marketing has changed over the past 50 or so years. It used to be the driver of a three-step process of 1. understanding what customers want, 2. organising to give it to them profitably and 3. telling them all about it.

Today, this has been changed so that marketing is now the driver of a much more intrumental three-step process of 1. create more stuff that we already make or that competitors make, 2. tell customers about it over and over again, and 3. manage away the customer queries, complaints and returns as cheaply as possible.”

In my opinion the article just emphasized how important it is to act now and change the way how companies organize for marketing and define the role marketing has within the organization. (Below the article there is also great dialogue about the matter.) Read here

The CMO’s should have the best view on how the customers both perceive and experience the company and translate that reality for business owners and the CEO. Mandate for this position comes from the customers. The CMO’s role is to understand how the product/service range and customer experience influence the overall value experience, brand perception and preference, demand and capacity to generate premium pricing. CMO should define how the company should position different products and services in order to optimize the overall growth, sales and profit margin.

Dr. Rod King’s tools for Blue Ocean dashboard tool felt like rather easy and rapid tool for over all view creation, opening eyes for the whole. Here it is:

Naturally branding and brand identity has a lot to do with subconscious and emotions along with rational mind. The business owners are  rational, which doesn’t guarantee success and most certainly doesn’t drive willingness to pay premium. Business owners often demand rapid results, which easily leads to tactical marketing emphasis, which only decline people’s willingness to pay for quality and drives opportunistic customer behavior. This is where marketing must bring the magic in. Creativity has more demand now than it has ever had due to the cluttered market and overwhelming amount of marketing messages everywhere.
Marketing has a strategic role inside the corporate hierarchy, it’s time to act and wipe away the perception of marketing, that is now dominating business owners minds.
Let’s face it. Marketing has an identity crisis and Marketing as a “brand” is suffering from wrong “brand perception” and customer experience defects. Lets re-define the meaning of marketing, polish the “brand” and it’s value for other corporate board members. This is why Future CMO Movement was founded!
I hope this community could become a place for game changers to exchange ideas and share experiences. In case you think you would have great material to share, please contact me and I’ll grant you author rights for this blog. Contact me via toni.keskinen(at)gmail.com
Also check out these articles:

Author: Toni Keskinen, Marketing Architect & Customer Journey Designer

http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen

Join Future CMO Movement LinkedIn Group here

Business Design.. with customer centricity

Here is my presentation that is about Business Design and how you lay the foundation of business development and value generation on customer journey and diminish the complexity to understandable and measurable insights and practices to marketing, operations and R&D. Recognition and simplification is the way to go and insights come from that. I’ve just landed back to my roots and start Business Development consulting which is really about customer and total marketing driven corporate transformation. That’s why it was relevant to take a look back and make a fusion from past to current.

I came to conclusion that past was already right – but required a lot to learn in order to develop the understanding and methods further.. Even if your theory and concept were perfect – making it a practice and a reality takes a lot of sweat, consideration, trial and error, right context, position and organization. However, enjoy. This material was better than I remembered (I was a founding member at Taivas Business Design and OneExperience planning director before my assignment as marketing architect at Toinen PHD and starated Future CMO transformation consulting and coaching in Jan 2014). 

WHY THIS ONE EXPERIENCE FAILED TO SCALE INTERNATIONALLY?
One Experience was a cross-channel behavior analytics tool and methodology we at Taivas Group started developing already back in 2004. Professor for Masscustomization Jarmo Suominen (MIT/UIAH) contributed to the theory and framework tremendously in the beginning and I led the project turning the ideology in to OneExperience online platform. This tool was extremely advanced back then but also represented a Utopia as practice. It turned out the tool was not viable back then due to siloed ecosystem which made it totally impossible to distribute and scale globally as a SaaS planning platform. Combination of qualitative and quantitative studying methods and total planning approach delivering insights about customer interfaces, brand status, distribution channels and product/service qualities it was impossible to integrate in WPP organisation and scale with Ogilvy Group, JWT, RMG, G2, GroupM, MillwardBrown… Why? We talked to everybody and they all loved it. Well, you would have needed to involve crm, online, advertising, promotion, creatives and media planning from separate organizations and align all their efforts for unified practice and goals. The same applied to client organizations. CMO’s at that point were more brand and advertising directors than true business drivers with full marketing spectrum and integration to operations.
That.. well.. was utopia in 2007 when we launched the tools.  We did good in Finland where we were a single team working for clients in Finnish culture with low organization hierarchy enabling collaboration directly with CMO, board of directors and business managers responsible for operations. We did great results but could not turn OneExperience in to international business as such.
The world has changed over the past five years.. This change is now reaching the tippin’ point. Perhaps we are closer to that Utopia now.. or are we? This change involves every one in the ecosystem and everyone inside corporate management. This is what we are now trying to do at ToinenPHD in Finnish scale. Is the world ready for scaling this kind of Total marketing approach and Customer Journey driven ideology in to practical daily work. Are CMO’s and the ecosystem ready for it now? Is it possible to make Utopia a reality?
SEE ALSO:

Author: Toni Keskinen, Marketing Architect & Customer Journey Designer

http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen

Join FutureCMO Movement LinkedIn Group here

CMO challenge – How to organize marketing for success?

This time this article is more about a question, than an answer. We do need to change but to what? Earlier on I wrote an article about how the creative work and marketing planning will transform in to something new.  As we do know the brand’s own customer interfaces are becoming more and more important as a media and amazing tools for continuous relationships and engagement. Customer interface management is becoming do or die for CMOs. Understanding Customer Journey and the dynamics around it are becoming the new black in planning process. Altogether the priorities are rapidly changing as well as the the organization and world around CMO. Forbes just published an article about “The end of Expert – Why no one in marketing knows what they are doing?” 

“It’s a stark verdict from a prominent source. “There are hundreds of thousands of people who were trained and mentored, and studied classical marketing, and they got good at it,” says Clark Kokich, chairman of digital agency Razorfish. Unfortunately, the world has changed – and that education is no longer relevant. “If your self-worth and your confidence is based on you being an expert, you’re in deep trouble, because there aren’t any experts,” says Kokich, author of Do or Die: Surviving and Thriving in a World Where the Old Ways of Marketing Aren’t Getting It Done. “Sure, there are experts in some fields. Someone may be really good in SEO or in mobile. But there aren’t any experts in making this transition”

So, how should CMO arrange his/her internal organization and how should creative work be a) created b)produced and c) measured. How should the marketing overall work flow internally and externally? What kind of partner structure would be ideal? What to in-source and outsource?

There are several task to take care of:

  • Define who are your customers, what kind of behavior do you want from them and what kind of actions actually deliver such behavior?
  • Define how do you reach them and how do you communicate with them
  • How do you create and manage own web interface, social media interfaces, customer service, retail, sales,..
  • How do you create big ideas that inspire and contribute to the corporate overall image as well as turn these inspirational ideas in to customer experiences?
  • How do you measure and quantify, learn and implement continuous change?

Earlier on you had one agency for above the line creative design. These guys were the kings of the hill and everything else was less important. Then you had below the line agencies for Direct marketing, email marketing, in-store promotion, promotions in general, marketing PR, SEO and SEM agency, media agency, research agency, online agency,… Well, you had all these agencies and you had internal organization and a person to run each agency or discipline along with budget allocated for that specific purpose. eg. Direct marketing. This kind of world view has died over the past five years.

The new world is still under construction. You have now creativity in media agencies and analytics people in creative agencies. The new ways of organizing and sharing responsibility  are just emerging. This is why I hope you could participate and share your best working practices and experiences for collaboration.

SEE ALSO

“The CMO 2013 Study insights and what CMO’s should do now”

Lost insights and Corporate Blind Spots

Business Design with customer centricity

How to enable smart company and avoid corporate autism

Author: Toni Keskinen, Marketing Architect & Customer Journey Designer

http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen

Join FutureCMO Movement LinkedIn Group here

Loyalty for pragmatists – it’s not about loyalty schemes

This post is about loyalty. Loyalty is about people’s willingness to stay as a customer or re-purchase when the time comes. Attrition is about customers leaving the company (defect).  For one reason or another customer relationships end inevitably, in grave at the latest. Here are some learning’s about reasons for attrition and ways of avoiding it as well as possible.

Most established companies could get enough new customers relatively easy. The biggest effect on revenue comes from attrition. In many cases new customers could take two years to breakeven. When any customer who has been a customer for more than two years leave or stop buying repeatedly, it’s directly away from profits. If customers leave before breakeven, their effect has been negative. The easiest profit increase would be an outcome of increased loyalty.

Let’s take a look at some loyalty strategies:

  1. Rational  
  2. Emotional Loyalty
  3. Habit based loyalty
  4. Legal loyalty
  5.  Structural bonds
  6. Imprinted customers
  7. Symbiosis strategy (subject to another article: Symbiosis-strategy-creating-the-ultimate-value-proposition/)

Rational loyalty

Most loyalty programs don’t deliver brand loyalty, really. That is due to the fact that people have all loyalty cards and they pick cherries from where ever they happen to find best offer at that point. Points based loyalty programs are often buying loyalty from customer. You get more discount when you buy more and you get offers only available for members. Loyalty program effectively lower the best customers profitability. It’s completely rationally driven model that create a behavioural pattern for customers to buy when it’s cheap. Naturally, they don’t if you don’t have an offer for them.

Most often, members also get bulk messaging in which there is nothing personal. A membership equals the license to sell. Selling is often positive. Customers consider selling as active relationship in which the company is offering new services and value for them (servicing by selling). Buying several solutions from a single company result stronger relationship and lower attrition probability. Everything above is basically positive, better than no program. However, when customer relationship is based on rational decision, another company with more aggressive approach can do considerable damage.

Newspaper and magazine subscription sales are a great example that illustrates what kind of damage you can do to the market with your own actions. Short-term victories could easily result long-term losses. Similar fight has also been raving around mobile handset and connection plans. When companies are concentrating on new business, they easily neglect the effects of such orientation to their current customer base resulting negative churn. Another example could be mortgage marginal wars, selling home loans at almost non-existent loan marginal just for the sake of market share. People could be lazy but they are not dumb. If loyalty becomes twice as expensive compared to small efforts and feels unfair and at worst offensive. Such strategy is not likely to create a lot of sympathy or feeling of being appreciated as a customer.

If you are making strong offers, you need a justification for them. Justification equal short term and special conditions enabling such offers. If you don’t have justification people start expecting lower rates in general and just stop buying at normal price. Rational loyalty is a strategy that works for price fighters and low cost offerings that don’t have a brand or other competitive tools. For others, rationally driven programs without further consideration should be considered dangerous. Buying loyalty is bad for business.

Emotional loyalty

In many cases one of the strongest driver of loyalty is the brand. Brand as a whole has its foundation in customer experience, quality, integrity, service, ethics, corporate responsibility and values. If the brand feels right for the customer he’s less likely to consider competitors. Also, the loved brands don’t lose customers without warning. If customers love you, they let you know if your pricing or position is having a strong challenger and they actively ask your approach to the situation. Emotional loyalty is not price driven. You can have healthy margins and customers accept it. In such a position customers also offer their helping hand and are much more open to participate in open innovation dialogue or giving you advice how to improve your service even more or what new services they would love to buy from you.

As the world is becoming increasingly transparent any actions the company does influence the brand. Where is the production done? How does the employer take care of employees? How environmentally conscious the company is? What kind of values the company is having it’s foundation on? How do those values show for me as a customer? In current business environment there’s too much of everything all the time. It’s very difficult to differentiate yourself by offering or pricing. For customer loyalty programs stand for them showing their loyalty to the company. There are stages from bronze to gold and your role is to climb up that ladder. If you do, you get stuff even cheaper. Great. Completely opposite strategy that is more emotionally driven is to consider how the company can show loyalty towards the customer. How do you take care of your customer? How do you make certain that the value you are delivering to your customer becomes even higher. How do you solve problems that your customers have?

IKEA is an amazing case of combining rational and emotional value in to a complete package. IKEA has justified their “democratic” business approach by making it clear to all customers why they can offer premium quality at low cost. How they are solving your challenges at home at affordable cost. IKEA marketing is about Scandinavian design, the advertising highlight high quality and beauty and the prices next to products are not the core message, but they effectively look like a bargain in that context. IKEA Family loyalty program is quite rationally driven but the company brand has more to it. IKEA’s service processes are also in place and it’s easy to return or exchange purchased products without questions asked. Once you have visited IKEA, the other options don’t really feel the same ever again. If IKEA had chosen to emphasize price, they would have been just another low cost player and would never have become such dominant global player.

Habit based loyalty

In most businesses there comes a time when customers re-consider whether to buy the same brand again or to buy something else. If the customer is involved in continuous relationship it requires active sign-off from the current relationship. If you can turn single purchases in to continuous relationships in any way, you are likely to drive much higher loyalty. That’s the best part. Once the customer is engaged in continuous relationship it requires time and effort to close it. The best psychological themes for loyalty are: laziness and minimizing points of discontinuity creating experiences like billing. One of the great ways of improving loyalty is allowing customers to have automatic payment methods directly from account or via credit card. As a result customer does not get direct invoice for the service delivered but it’s included in credit card invoice or directly paid from account. Attrition probability drop is quite significant with such a method. Actually, customers find out about the invoice after it’s already paid. Another great way to avoid attrition and increase predictability is to sell service for certain period of time.

When people establish behavioural patterns like reading a newspaper every morning, their likelihood of attrition is much lower. Habit based loyalty is really about keeping the status quo. Low profile and making certain that there is no need for active consideration for the customer enable very profitable type of loyalty. If you have any way to enforce habits you should take them.

If the business environment is turbulent and advancing very rapidly you could come to situation where your existing customers are clearly paying too much to the point where you just can’t justify it anymore. Finnish telecom operator Elisa doubled broadband customers speed twice in two years because the price of bandwidth was decreasing so rapidly. This approach generated strong loyalty and healthy margins because the brand actively improved service level according to market conditions. Such approach strongly enforced customer’s habit and decision to stay with the company instead of changing to another one. Combination of rational and emotional response enforced habit.

Another fantastic case of habitual loyalty is online banking. The first online bank was issued in Finland and since then the whole retail banking has changed completely. People no longer have a reason to go to the bank. They can take care of all their finances online. As an outcome people have become user interface loyal. Only in case of major need for relationship driver service, like mortgage, people would consider changing their bank relationship. Relationship driver services are major issues that are big enough to question the current relationship. This is rare though and in case the bank meets, even close, the other offers, people will stay. Online banking is like water, as long as you get it when you need it, there’s no problem. If you don’t, you have a major problem. If the service keeps on going there’s nothing to question the current relationship. Online banking enabled huge cost cuts and automated service processes. Cost to serve is now marginal. Previously most of the profits had come from bigger investors and bigger loans. Once online banking was introduced and became a habit for customers, the vast majority of customers became profitable. Banking margins and profits have grown and the profitability has increased without attrition.

Imprinted loyalty

Especially in case of professional service, customers are not necessarily loyal to the company, but person they are in relationship with. If customers get imprinted to their counterpart and the person stays with the company, relationships could be very strong emotionally, rationally and habitually. Trusted person can be an enormous asset for a company.

The online revolution has diminished the role of person-to-person relationships in consumer businesses. The role of brands and trust in service processes has substituted the void to some extent. It’s not quite the same but works too.

The company’s customer interface, people servicing customers should still be trained to reach for such relationships. The brand is as good as the person representing it.

Some major hairdresser chains evaluate their employees based on the fact, how many of the hairdresser’s customers book their next visit for the same hairdresser. This measure is beautifully simple and revealing. Being a great hairdresser is not just about the quality of your work, it’s very much about the whole experience. Especially women open up and discuss at the hairdresser. They could easily spend two hours with the hairdresser and spend a lot of money on the experience. It’s about being heard, appreciated and pampered along with getting your hair cut and dyed.

In car sales it’s a known fact that the best car salesmen have customer relationships that follow them and exchange from one car brand to another just because the person is advising them to do so. Getting people imprinted to the people they are buying from should be considered as a strategic loyalty approach.

In business-to-business customer relationships the change of contact person is one of the most likely discontinuity probability increasing situations. Relationships are personal and the new person equal almost the same as changing the partner. It is really important to handle such situations carefully.

Legal (Contractual) Loyalty

Mobile operators in Finland suffered from very high attrition rates after number portability was enabled. Churn rates reached +30% level even though customers were very happy with their operators. Customers want to have a new mobile phone every two to three years. The need to get a new handset created natural discontinuity to relationship. Mobile operators have oriented at offering good deals for new customers and winning higher share of dynamic market. This orientation led to higher advantage for changing a company than staying with the current one. These operators had same level of perceived value and customers had rarely real preference. Most customers had only options that were equally good in general. Only differentiating factors were the brand communications and current offers.

The operators started selling customers 12 month agreements, which offered lower cost calls in the evenings or weekends. These agreements sold quite well and led to lower attrition rates. Once 3G bundles were introduced they included 24 months agreement and were sold with handset subsidies. Against your 24 months agreement you got the mobile phone at half price. These agreements dropped attrition rates below 10%. In other words agreements offered steady relationships and predictability. As a result mobile operators profits increased and people purchased more expensive mobile phones, which enabled major increase in the use of data creating completely new mass market. Everybody won. After the 24 month agreements ended, the attrition rates increased back to 15-20%. Although the attrition rate increased, they didn’t reach previously familiar 30% rates.

If customer is not really experiencing very bad service, they are likely to stay in the current relationship. Human nature is lazy and towards many product and service ranges, indifferent. If customers are happy, they could ask offers just to bargain with current partner. That’s still better than losing clients. People rarely start actively comparing other options if they are satisfied. If they do, it’s most likely to check the pricing. In order to gain market share in a business like this brand has to actively sell and create discontinuity with sales. Electricity agreements are great example of this. Very few people compare electricity pricing and actively change a power company unless it’s actively sold. When you get a call offering you -5% and the power which is produced with water and greener than your current option, it’s easy to agree. Even better, the new company also close the previous deal so that the only thing you need to do is say ”yes” on phone. It is possible to surprise a competitor with heavy attack in a case like this. Unless the competitor has closed agreements for certain period of time, they are likely to lose a lot of customers almost over night. Who would start comparing for 5%? Very few would. Who would accept such offer when it doesn’t require any effort? Quite many will. Only thing hindering people to accept such an offer would be to tie them in the relationship with an agreement for certain period of time.

Loyalty by structural Bond

What could you sell your customer to make him dependent on you? In case of larger IT companies, structural bonds are the biggest driver of loyalty. When you buy an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system and your company becomes completely dependent on it to function, you certainly have bought a structural bond. It’s an interesting approach to loyalty to create value in which the customer becomes dependent on. There’s interesting consumer applications to this too.

When Polar Electro introduced their wrist top computers with heart rate monitoring they soon created online Personal Trainer to supplement additional training advice for users beyond possibilities in the cadget in it self. Personal Trainer recorded all your training to a database and created record. It helped analyzing your training requirements and results very effectively. In early 2000 this was a ground breaking innovation. When all your training history was online, Polar Electro had a structural bond on you. If you wanted to change to more advance training tools, you had to buy another Polar wrist-top-computer in case you wanted to keep your training record ongoing. Currently mobile phones have same functions and you can use variety of platforms for storing your training history. These platforms effectively still create structural bond although it’s now cadget independent and available to iPhone, Nokia and android. Still, Polar Electro’s Training Tool is an effective loyalty driver for everyone who has been using it for the past decade.

Facebook also has such a structural bond, your friends that are already there. When everyone is already there, it becomes very difficult to leave and completely stop using it. It is also very challenging for other services to get really active users, because Facebook is a strong habit and it holds your entire social life and has become big part of yourself – part of who you are and how you represent yourself to the world.

Attrition

No matter what you do, some customers will leave eventually. Still, applying effective win back strategies could diminish negative churn. One company actually managed to winback 80% of already lost customers. Win back operation was probably the most profitable function the company had ever created.

When you are trying to develop your company’s customer relationship excellence, you can’t just look in to customers who are happy. Their responses will only strengthen the status quo and hinder innovation and adaptation to changing business environment. Lost customers on the other hand are a great source of insight and improvement advice. Any information that help you predict discontinuity, increase the probability of re-purchase, or shield customers from competitors influence and decrease retention clearly increase profitability.

Some actionable and easy advice

Here are some advice for improvement in loyalty, customer experience and business with customers using your services or products:

  1. When you are developing your offering and customer relationship, you should try to recognize the contexts and motives your customers are using your products and services in and what is their value in use. Understanding value in use and delivering a service experience hold insights for improvement and innovation. Single purchase could be changed in to continuous relationship by turning your product or service in to a platform that allow creation of even higher value and new solutions that increase value, profitability and scale.
  2. You need to have a communication channel with customers. If you have a loyalty card offering or continuous relationship that is easy. If you are selling 3i- services or products (high investment, -interest or –involvement), people are willing to give their contacts for you. If you are in FMCG of CPG business, you should still strive to get people to connect with you directly or using platforms like Facebook or Twitter. Direct connection with your customers enables feedback, advice, and introduction of new, capturing dissatisfaction and making it right. Connection to customers is vital for improvement and creating a feeling of relationship – it’s the company’s most valuable asset. It should be taken care of keeping that in mind.
  3. If you collect data from your customers, they expect you to use it. Asking questions from customers and capturing their customer behaviour on card transactions equal promise. Brand’s responsibility is to redeem that promise.
  4. Communicating personally is respect. Understanding customer and communicating personally show appreciation and create emotional loyalty. Asking questions and responding personally is rarely used method of engaging and creating emotional relationship that is capable of breaking habits and creating new ones.
  5. Analogical is becoming premium in the era of digital communications. Face to face, phone service by a person and traditional mailings are becoming statements of respect and appreciation in highly digitalized businesses. Just think about receiving a letter from Facebook or Apple. That would really be special J A hand written note as a letter would really indicate that someone has taken the time to consider you personally.

Author: Toni Keskinen, Marketing Architect & Customer Journey Designer

http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen

Join FutureCMO Movement LinkedIn Group here

Customer Journey – creating order in to a chaos

What is it that you need to pay attention to, when you are optimizing marketing profitability, designing new products, measuring your organization, forecasting customer behavior in case of changes in the market conditions or deciding about investment allocation. In my opinion, there is one single theory, ideology and toolkit that can help in any decision-making and management development than anything else: Customer Journey. Lets start with definition:

Customer Journey Management: The art and science of customer-centric methods, skills and tools for synchronization of customer’s needs and company’s offering optimally by handling and managing offline and online touch points profitably.

 Customer journey is literally the customer’s individual and personal journey covering all stages along customer’s transition from never-a-customer to always –a- customer.  By customer journey we mean the whole customer life-cycle from brand as a platform to initiation, choosing and buying, using the product or service journey to re-consideration and re-purchase or attrition

Whenever talking about customer journey mapping with my clients, the same question comes up: ”Our business is different from others, so how can we apply customer journey mapping?” It is true, that the businesses are different, the decision-making dynamics are different and the journeys are different, even within the same business category two competing brands have different journeys.

Customer Journey is exactly what it sounds like. Customers perspective in the decision-making process from initiation to cross-channel decision-making path and eventually post purchase satisfaction & recommendations. Customer Journeys can be broken into five major parts you could consider as customer journey chapters:

Image

Pre-buying Customer Journeys include brand as a platform, initiation, choosing and buying. Rest of them are post purchase journeys. Each pre-purchase customer journey is always subject to be influenced by other brands. CRM and very often customer journey mapping research is only looking at the brand’s own touch points and conversions. Majority of the business dynamics and customer experience is outside your own brand’s reach though. When you are mapping the customer journey and customer behavior you need to look at the customer’s chaotic experience and find order to it. Customers are using heuristics and simplifying their decision-making, you need to know what they are.

However, the core is to understand what can be done in order to improve the single brand’s customer journey success against all others and learn from competitors when losing. In many products and services this journey is not followed step by step. Recognising how people skip stages, buy spontaneously or use different heuristics (like brands) in guiding them, is as important as understanding the stages. Post-purchase customer journeys are easier to isolate within the brand’s influence. Because of this they are also easier to study and plan. In case of new needs or re-buying, the market influence is stronger again.

Customer Journey stage 1: Brand as a platform

Customer Journey stage 2: Initiation

Customer Journey stag 3: Choosing and buying – cross-channel influence

How to map and study Customer Journey

Author: Toni Keskinen, Marketing Architect & Customer Journey Designer

http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen

Join FutureCMO Movement LinkedIn Group here

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