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Marketing has an identity crisis – Blue Ocean dashboard

I just found Dr. Rod King’s Blue Ocean dashboard and process tools from SlideShare today and thought about how necessary it is to understand the whole value creation process in order to manage brand effectively. The number one branding responsible inside the company is actually the CEO, as he is often the only person in a company responsible for the total experience.

Brand identity is a reflection of the company, it has to be real and true. False promises and wrong kind of identity only generate dissatisfaction and distrust. You are what you are and you can improve, but you can’t stretch too far. Marketing is often responsible for the identity design, business managers are responsible for the experience. This approach doesn’t work anymore – The brand from the customer’s perspective is one single entity and the experience and perception must be a solid combination.

Mr. Graham Hill, well-known and great CRM and customer experience expert whom I respect very much just published an article: How Stupidity, Short-termism and Immorality Ruined Marketing in Customer Think -blog. Here’s a quote:

“If you take a step back you will see that the ethos of marketing has changed over the past 50 or so years. It used to be the driver of a three-step process of 1. understanding what customers want, 2. organising to give it to them profitably and 3. telling them all about it.

Today, this has been changed so that marketing is now the driver of a much more intrumental three-step process of 1. create more stuff that we already make or that competitors make, 2. tell customers about it over and over again, and 3. manage away the customer queries, complaints and returns as cheaply as possible.”

In my opinion the article just emphasized how important it is to act now and change the way how companies organize for marketing and define the role marketing has within the organization. (Below the article there is also great dialogue about the matter.) Read here

The CMO’s should have the best view on how the customers both perceive and experience the company and translate that reality for business owners and the CEO. Mandate for this position comes from the customers. The CMO’s role is to understand how the product/service range and customer experience influence the overall value experience, brand perception and preference, demand and capacity to generate premium pricing. CMO should define how the company should position different products and services in order to optimize the overall growth, sales and profit margin.

Dr. Rod King’s tools for Blue Ocean dashboard tool felt like rather easy and rapid tool for over all view creation, opening eyes for the whole. Here it is:

Naturally branding and brand identity has a lot to do with subconscious and emotions along with rational mind. The business owners are  rational, which doesn’t guarantee success and most certainly doesn’t drive willingness to pay premium. Business owners often demand rapid results, which easily leads to tactical marketing emphasis, which only decline people’s willingness to pay for quality and drives opportunistic customer behavior. This is where marketing must bring the magic in. Creativity has more demand now than it has ever had due to the cluttered market and overwhelming amount of marketing messages everywhere.
Marketing has a strategic role inside the corporate hierarchy, it’s time to act and wipe away the perception of marketing, that is now dominating business owners minds.
Let’s face it. Marketing has an identity crisis and Marketing as a “brand” is suffering from wrong “brand perception” and customer experience defects. Lets re-define the meaning of marketing, polish the “brand” and it’s value for other corporate board members. This is why Future CMO Movement was founded!
I hope this community could become a place for game changers to exchange ideas and share experiences. In case you think you would have great material to share, please contact me and I’ll grant you author rights for this blog. Contact me via toni.keskinen(at)gmail.com
Also check out these articles:

Author: Toni Keskinen, Marketing Architect & Customer Journey Designer

http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen

Join Future CMO Movement LinkedIn Group here

The CMO Survey 2013 & insights – What CMO’s should do now?

Screen Shot 2013-05-29 at 8.41.47 AM

The Duke University’s CMO Survey 2013 results highlighted again the need for marketing and CMO’s to carry more responsponsibility and integrate better with the corporate management and operations. It seems to me that marketing is facing the same evolution that car engines have gone thru since 1960’s. In the 60’s car engines were large, heavy, powerfull and impressive but their gas consumption was just terrible and their efficiency unacceptable in current evaluation. Currently engines are much smaller but deliver a lot of power with very low gas consumption. The big and impressive modern engines have amazing power with acceptable gas consumption. The engine game is all about efficiency, as it should be.

This is the case that CMO’s are facing now too. The way to get there is very much about understanding the big picture (customers, their needs and drivers, choice criteria, their cross-channel behaviour and corporate capacity to serve and deliver great customer experience across touchpoints), managing analytics and customer interface operations. The multitude of digital and analogical touch points has exploded and require very much consideration in order to come up with the essentials and focus on what matters. Marketing budget, according to CMO survey, is currently 10,6% of corporate overall budget and if we add to that retail, sales, customer service, customer managament related technology and online service investments, the customer interface investment in total is eventually what runs the company. This combination is what matters most and should be considered as an entity that must be analyzed and managed in an integrated way. See article Marketing do-or-die -managing customer interfaces

According to the CMO survey 2013:

  • 6% of marketing budget is allocated to marketing analytics and it is expected to grow to 10% over the next three years. However, only 30% of company’s projects use marketing analytics and leverage insights from it
  • Social media share of budget is currently 8,5% and it is expected to be 11,5% by the end of the year and 21,6% in the next five years. However, for the past several year the level of social media integration to marketing strategy has remained at the level of 3,8 in a scale 1=not integrated to 7=very integrated. The spending is expected to more than double but even in current situation the value social media could deliver is not being effectively harnessed.
  • The CMO’s role is weakening in the areas of CRM, new product development, sales, pricing, innovation
  • The company’s next 12 months expectations though highlight success in customer retention and profit increase and the companies are concentrating on diversification strategy (new products – new customers) and organic growth.

To me these results mean, that CMO’s are actually shying away from the corporate center. The best companies are already using Customer Journey design tools and managing customer interfaces in an integrated way, which really enable CMO’s to fine tune their engines and deliver much higher return on investment. These companies are rare though. The results show that in majority of cases CMO’s and marketing department’s role is weakening. Over time this can only mean declining budgets or declining role of CMO.

We are currently living in very rapidly changing environment from which the marketing has best understanding and the board has least understanding. The boards are now more interested in customers than ever, and they need answers. Sheryl Pattek’s (CMO for Forrester research) article highlights how National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD), a group of board-of-director members from the US’s most prestigious companies is discussing the topic: How to keep corporate boards relevant in the 21st century. This is Sheryl’s view on the discussion:

The discussion that morning focused on the need to respond to and keep pace with the rapid change in customer behavior to stay competitive. It also addressed how current board members could keep up with the evolution of customer touchpoints to understand the new digitally-based strategies that are increasingly being shared with them. What I found striking about the discussion after some reflection was that the realization of the critical importance of customer behavior on the future success of top companies has made it all the way to the boardroom. The age of the customer that Forrester first identified in 2011 has really arrived and goes well beyond marketing. Why now? Corporate boards are starting to realize that to provide the strategic guidance and governance that their role requires, they need to better understand customers and how the relationship between them and the companies they direct are changing. And they need to understand it fast. The market is moving and changing too rapidly to be left behind.” (see the full article here: CMOs, Is Joining A Board of Directors Part of Your Career Plan? If Not . . . It Should Be.)

This is the time when marketing can really, finally become corporate center – driver for management change and change management.  Mr. Steven Cook, the founder of Fortune CMO network has made a great presentation about this subject with some cases. Enjoy.

 

SEE ALSO:

FutureCMO definitions

Lost insights and Corporate Blind Spots

Business Design with customer centricity

How to enable smart company and avoid corporate autism

Author: Toni Keskinen, Marketing Architect & Customer Journey Designer

http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonikeskinen

Join FutureCMO Movement LinkedIn Group here
 
 
 
 

Christine Moorman is the Director of The CMO Survey®
http://youtu.be/gqOGVZE-tMo

The CMO Survey 2013 results in full:

Critical Responsibilities and Competencies – Strategy

Critical Responsibilities and Competencies

Strategic Planning

  • Work closely with business leaders and key resources to understand business objectives and issues in order to align marketing strategies that will support goals.
  • Develop a roadmap for creating and maintaining a performance driven marketing program, accountable to overall business and financial objectives.

Marketing Strategy

  • Develop and manage integrated customer-facing strategies and strategic objectives that maximize customer value.

The strategy must identify and address customer segments for each of company’s core offerings, and understand and maintain focus on Customer Lifetime Value, reduced Churn, and overall Profit Volume for the company.

  • As the brand champion, they must define clear positioning for the brand as a whole, and each core brand/offering. Identify opportunities to build and strengthen brand equity and ensure branding guidelines are followed consistently throughout the organization.

Develop and support internal and external communication programs to ensure company, product and market positioning consistent with the company’s strategies and vision.

  • Oversee all media surrounding the brand, including PR programs, Social Media, Events (manage outsourced), Sponsorships, Paid Search, Display, Direct Mail, etc.
  • Manage vendor relationships, as needed, pursuant to marketing objectives.


Strategic Planning

  • Work closely with business leaders and key resources to understand business objectives and issues in order to align marketing strategies that will support goals.
  • Develop a roadmap for creating and maintaining a performance driven marketing program, accountable to overall business and financial objectives.

Marketing Strategy

  • Develop and manage integrated customer-facing strategies and strategic objectives that maximize customer value.

The strategy must identify and address customer segments for each of company’s core offerings, and understand and maintain focus on Customer Lifetime Value, reduced Churn, and overall Profit Volume for the company.

  • As the brand champion, they must define clear positioning for the brand as a whole, and each core brand/offering. Identify opportunities to build and strengthen brand equity and ensure branding guidelines are followed consistently throughout the organization.

Develop and support internal and external communication programs to ensure company, product and market positioning consistent with the company’s strategies and vision.

  • Oversee all media surrounding the brand, including PR programs, Social Media, Events (manage outsourced), Sponsorships, Paid Search, Display, Direct Mail, etc.
  • Manage vendor relationships, as needed, pursuant to marketing objectives.
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